Tuesday, September 25th, 2018 am30 9:34am

NCAA Final Four may illustrate some of coaching’s big perks

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USA TODAY Sports’ Dan Wolken explains the new methods Division I schools are using to hire head coaches who can revolutionize their basketball programs. USA TODAY Sports

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Oregon men’s basketball coach Dana Altman may be surrounded by family and friends at this weekend’s NCAA Final Four in Glendale, Ariz.

And the Oregon athletics department may end up paying the bill.

Under a provision in his contact, “upon presentation of proper receipts,” Altman can get up to $25,000 a year in reimbursements for “travel expenses incurred by him to visit friends or relatives, travel expenses incurred by him to have relatives or friends visit, or travel expenses incurred by him to have friends or relatives attend University athletic events.”

USA TODAY Sports annually tracks compensation for college basketball coaches who make the NCAA tournament, including requesting copies of their contracts.

What NCAA tournament coaches make:Salary database

Altman’s immediate family had been covered by a separate part of his deal, under which the university agrees to pay for his wife and dependent children to travel within the continental United States to postseason games, including the Pac-12 Conference tournament. (All of Altman’s four children are out of college, and his wife and one other family member get to go to all regular-season away games.)

Game tickets? All but a done deal. Oregon “shall make a good faith effort to provide” Altman with 12 tickets to each away, conference tournament and postseason game.

Altman is getting $1.8 million in basic compensation for this season, and he’s set for an annual retention payment that this year will give him $850,000 if he remains Oregon’s head coach through the end of his contract year, April 25. In addition, he has picked up $215,000 in incentive bonuses so far.

But he’s far from the only highly compensated men’s basketball coach with family travel considerations built into his contract.

Kansas will pay “the reasonable travel expenses” of Bill Self’s wife and children in attending his team’s games outside Lawrence.

Arizona coach Sean Miller’s wife and children under 23 can get seats on team charter flights to postseason games, along with game tickets.

MORE COACH SALARIES:

These types of provisions are among the array of perks, bonuses and unusual arrangements coaches have in their contracts.

► Self gets all of the athletics department’s royalty payments from the sale of in-store retail merchandise by KUStore.com during every June, including dorm sales during basketball camps.

► Maryland’s Mark Turgeon gets the use of a suite for all football home games.

► Kansas State’s contract with Bruce Weber acknowledges that he owns the domain name www.coachbruceweber.com, although Weber agrees to license its use to Kansas State and its internet affiliates on a royalty-free basis for as long as he remains the school’s coach.

► Florida State’s Leonard Hamilton is entitled to operate a camp as a private enterprise and keep the profits in excess of expenses. The school helps with this by agreeing to reimburse expenses “directly related to the operation of the camp” in an amount not to exceed $50,000 per year.

Hamilton also has 17 bonus provisions in his contract that provide him with the opportunity to gain a total of $2.675 million in incentives in a season. He picked up $450,000 of that this season.

► East Tennessee State agreed to provide Steve Forbes with free tuition at the university for one dependent.

► As long as Michigan State coach Tom Izzo does not leave the school for another college basketball coaching job or get fired for specific causes, he is entitled to four tickets and a parking pass for all Michigan State regular-season football and basketball home games for the rest of his life. The school agrees to “use its best efforts to accommodate the coach’s seating preferences for each game (club seats, box seats, suite seats, seats that are located near seats of other family or friends, etc.).”

NCAA tournament’s 15 highest-paid coaches

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No. 1: Rick Pitino, Louisville: $7,769,200 – Pitino’s

No. 1: Rick Pitino, Louisville: $7,769,200 – Pitino’s pay is boosted by more than $2.7 million in self-reported outside income that included $2.25 million from a personal services contract with Adidas. He’ll also get a $750,000 retention payment for remaining the school’s head coach on March 31.  Jamie Rhodes, USA TODAY SPorts
No. 2: John Calipari, Kentucky: $7,435,376 – Calipari’s

No. 2: John Calipari, Kentucky: $7,435,376 – Calipari’s basic compensation from the school increased from last season by a previously scheduled $600,000. It is set to go up by another $350,000 next season. He reported nearly $300,000 in outside income.  Jim Brown, USA TODAY Sports
No. 3: Mike Krzyzewski, Duke: $5,550,475 – Because

No. 3: Mike Krzyzewski, Duke: $5,550,475 – Because Duke is a private school, Krzyzewski’s total is the one reported on the school’s most recently available federal income tax return, which covers pay for the 2014 calendar year, including benefits and bonuses. Duke’s return stated that $492,500 of Krzyzewski’s total had been reported as deferred compensation on prior years’ returns.  Bob Donnan, USA TODAY Sports
No. 4: Bill Self, Kansas: $4,932,626 – Self’s compensation

No. 4: Bill Self, Kansas: $4,932,626 – Self’s compensation has been virtually unchanged since 2012, when he received a roughly $1.3 million increase.  Denny Medley, USA TODAY Sports
No. 5: Tom Izzo, Michigan State: $4,251,751 – Slight

No. 5: Tom Izzo, Michigan State: $4,251,751 – Slight rises in both his pay from the school and from outside sources are resulting in Izzo’s total compensation increasing by about $100,000 compared to what he made last season. At his pay level, that’s an increase of slightly less than 2.5%.  Mike Carter, USA TODAY Sports
No. 6: Bob Huggins, West Virginia: $3,590,000 – Huggins’

No. 6: Bob Huggins, West Virginia: $3,590,000 – Huggins’ pay increased from last season’s by a previously scheduled $250,000. It’s set to go up by another $175,000 during his 2017-18 contract year. He remains eligible for a $25,000 bonus for a regular-season win over Kansas – which he’s gotten four times.  Ben Queen, USA TODAY Sports
No. 7 John Beilein, Michigan: $3,370,000 – The terms

No. 7 John Beilein, Michigan: $3,370,000 – The terms of a new agreement that began in October 2015 are taking full effect during a contract year that ends April 15. The result is a pay increase from the school of nearly $530,000 over what Beilein received in 2015-16.  Mike Carter, USA TODAY Sports
No. 8: Gregg Marshall, Wichita State: $3,035,500 –

No. 8: Gregg Marshall, Wichita State: $3,035,500 – Working under a seven-year, rolling contract, Marshall saw his outside income decline by about $95,000 in the past year. But he’ll make that up soon, as his basic pay from the school is set to increase by $500,000 not long after the 2017-18 season.  Jeff Curry,USA TODAY Sports
No. 9: Scott Drew, Baylor: $2,818,811 – According to

No. 9: Scott Drew, Baylor: $2,818,811 – According to the private school’s most recently available tax records, Drew received more than $2.55 million in base compensation and $163,000 in bonus pay during the 2014 calendar year.  Brett Rojo, USA TODAY Sports
No. 10: Buzz Williams, Virginia Tech: $2,655,000 –

No. 10: Buzz Williams, Virginia Tech: $2,655,000 – The school’s huge investment in Williams began paying dividends this season as the Hokies made the NCAA tournament for the first time since 2007. Williams’ predecessor, James Johnson, was making less than $640,000 from the school in his final season, 2013-14.  Michael Thomas Shroyer, USA TODAY Sports
No. 11: Dana Altman, Oregon: $2,651,000 – Altman received

No. 11: Dana Altman, Oregon: $2,651,000 – Altman received a new seven-year contract and a $650,000 raise after leading the Ducks to the Elite Eight last season. This season, they reached the Final Four for the first time since 1939.  Denny Medley, USA TODAY Sports
No. 12: Steve Alford, UCLA: $2,644,000 – After last

No. 12: Steve Alford, UCLA: $2,644,000 – After last season, when the Bruins went 15-17, Alford renounced a one-year contract extension, through April 2021, that he’d been given in September 2014. He is not scheduled for any future pay increases.  Gary A. Vasquez,USA TODAY Sports
No. 13: Sean Miller, Arizona: $2,610,000 – Miller’s

No. 13: Sean Miller, Arizona: $2,610,000 – Miller’s compensation for this contract year is more than $2 million lower than it was for last year because he is not vesting further in a lucrative longevity fund. However, that vesting is scheduled to resume during his 2017-18 contract year.  Casey Sapio, USA TODAY Sports
No. 14: Mark Turgeon, Maryland: $2,577,054 – Turgeon

No. 14: Mark Turgeon, Maryland: $2,577,054 – Turgeon received a new seven-year contract that was announced in late October 2016, months after the Terrapins’ first NCAA tournament round-of-16 appearance since 2003. The deal resulted in a pay increase of more than $200,000 and it calls for annual increases of 5%.  Joseph Maiorana, USA TODAY Sports
No. 15: Jay Wright, Villanova: $2,540,958 – The private

No. 15: Jay Wright, Villanova: $2,540,958 – The private school’s most recently available tax records showed that $2.47 million of Wright’s compensation for the 2014 calendar year was reported as base compensation.  Eric Hartline, USA TODAY Sports

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