Wednesday, May 23rd, 2018 pm31 11:27pm

Amid warning of dangerous gases, new fissure opens up on Hawaii’s Big Island

A new fissure has opened up on Hawaii’s Big Island, bringing the total number of lava- and gas-spewing cracks to 20, the Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency said today.

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The 20th fissure cracked open in the Lanipuna Gardens subdivision, the agency confirmed in a Facebook post. And while no homes or roads are threatened by lava from the fissure at this time, officials did warn of “hazardous emissions of sulfur dioxide” in the neighborhood.

PHOTO: Lava erupts from a fissure on the outskirts of Pahoa during ongoing eruptions of the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii, May 14, 2018.Terray Sylvester/Reuters
Lava erupts from a fissure on the outskirts of Pahoa during ongoing eruptions of the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii, May 14, 2018.

The air quality is at a condition red, which means the air could pose an immediate danger, the Civil Defense Agency said in a post on Monday. The gases are especially dangerous for the elderly, children, babies and people with respiratory problems, officials said.

PHOTO: This image released by the US Geological Survey shows a fissure still erupting on May 14, 2018, and supplying lava to a flow that was still advancing at Hawaiis Big Island.AFP/Getty Images
This image released by the US Geological Survey shows a fissure still erupting on May 14, 2018, and supplying lava to a flow that was still advancing at Hawaii’s Big Island.

Booming eruptions from the fissures send lava and steam into the air. The number of fissures has been climbing steadily since May 3, when the volcano first erupted, destroying homes and prompting evacuations.

Following the eruption, smoke from the Kileaua volcano has even been visible from the International Space Station, according to an image posted by NASA on social media.

PHOTO: View of the Hawaiis Kilauea Volcano from the International Space Station in this undated image obtained from social media and tweeted on May 13, 2018.Andrew J. Feustel/NASA/via Reuters
View of the Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano from the International Space Station in this undated image obtained from social media and tweeted on May 13, 2018.

PHOTO: Around 2:30 p.m. HST, a steam jet appears on fissure 17, above the area with active fountaining, May 14, 2018, Hawaii.
SLIDESHOW: PHOTOS: Hawaii volcano emits hazardous gases and flowing lava

President Trump declared a major disaster in Hawaii following a request by the state’s governor.

The order will make federal funding available to supplement state and local recovery efforts.

Hawaii declared a state of emergency on May 3, the day volcanic activity began.

PHOTO: Volcanic gases rise from a fissure in the Leilani Estates subdivision during ongoing eruptions of the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii, May 14, 2018.Terray Sylvester/Reuters
Volcanic gases rise from a fissure in the Leilani Estates subdivision during ongoing eruptions of the Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii, May 14, 2018.

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